Sugar

    The sweet truth about cereal and sugar

    Brown or white, granulated or caster, in cubes or sachets, sugar is one of the ingredients in many foods, including breakfast cereals.

    Sugars intake in breakfast examples

    What is sugar's role?

    Sugar preserves, gives a texture, a nice golden colour and, of course, a sweeter flavour. Cereal is made mostly from grain, which can make it a good source of carbohydrate, dietary fibre, vitamins and minerals. So sugar is merely its partner (or maybe we should say sweetheart?).

    Sweet fact

    The World Health Organisation recommends a maximum of 10 teaspoons of added sugars a day. The good news is that many cereals contain two teaspoons or fewer of added sugars per serving." WHO recommends less than 10% of total energy intake from free sugars which are equivalent to 50g (or around 10 teaspoons) per day.

    Did you

    know?

    Oh mummy!

    Egyptians used to bury mummies with necklaces made from barley, and in 1324 King Edward II of England set the standard for the measurement - making the ‘inch’ equal to ‘three grains of barley, dry and round, placed end-to-end lengthwise’.

    Rice in disguise

    Wild rice isn’t really rice at all – it’s the seed of an aquatic grass originally grown by Native American tribes. It has a strong flavour and is quite expensive so it’s usually mixed with other types of rice.

    Just how sweet?

    Sugars from breakfast cereals make up around 5% of the average daily intake of added sugars for adults (8% for children[1]. And studies show that children who eat pre-sweetened breakfast cereal show no difference in their overall daily intake of sugars compared to those who don’t[2].

    So there you have it – the sweet truth about breakfast cereal and sugar. Now all you have to do is enjoy it !

    Nestlé cereals: they just got better for you

    Nestlé knows that a nutritious breakfast is important. Let us show you how we improve our recipes to provide you with a nutritious breakfast!

    Find out moreNestlé cereals: they just got better for you

    Footnotes

    1. Bates B et al (2014) UK National Diet & Nutrition Survey. Results from Years 1, 2, 3 and 4 (combined) of the Rolling Programme (2008/2009 – 2011/2012). London: Public Health England
    2. Albertson AM, Thompson DR, Franko DL et al (2011) Weight indicators and nutrient intake in children and adolescents do not vary by sugar content in ready-to-eat cereal: results from National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2001-2006. Nutr Res. Mar;31(3):229-36. • Bachman JL, Reedy J, Subar AF et al (2008) Sources of food group intakes among the U.S. population, 2001-2002. J Am Diet Assoc.;108(5):804-14. • INCA2 (2008) French National Dietary Survey.

    Let'stalk

    What are the health and nutritional benefits of Nestlé Gluten Free Corn Flakes?

    As well as being a healthy choice for people who want to reduce the amount of gluten in their diet, or have coeliac disease or a gluten intolerance, Gluten Free Corn Flakes are fortified with B-vitamins, folic acid and iron

    I’ve heard a low GI diet can help me lose weight. Is this true?

    It’s too early to say. The science in this area is still emerging. There is evidence that low GI foods take longer to digest and help you feel satisfied for longer, but none that you’ll eat fewer calories at the next meal.

    Is Nestlé planning to launch gluten-free versions of its other cereals or cereal bars?

    Not yet, but we will keep listening and responding to people’s needs.

    Why do some breakfast cereals have different serving sizes labeled on pack?

    The serving sizes mentioned on breakfast cereals can slightly differ, mainly due to differences in product density. Beyond its nutrients density, it’s also important for the portion size to suit the average cereal bowl. Some types of breakfast cereals, such as mueslis or granolas, are denser than traditional flakes; so a 30 g serving could look tiny and unrealistic in a bowl – that's why we use 45 g as a reference. These different serving sizes have been defined by the European cereals trade association and consistently applied by all industry members in Europe.

    Does the high GI of breakfast cereals negate the whole grain benefits?

    No. Even though some foods made with whole grain have a high GI, you can still benefit by including them in a healthy, balanced diet. Eating lots of whole grain can be good for the heart, even if the GI of the food is high. The whole population can benefit from eating more whole grain; the effect of low GI foods is still not clear.